Honorary doctorate for a force of nature – News

Professor David Suzuki warmly agreed to join the large UdeS family on 16 June.
Photo: Mathieu Lanthier – UdeS

His commitment to defending life in all its forms has traveled the globe. Sometimes activist, sometimes educator, the Canadian scientist David Suzuki has promoted the environmental cause in many ways. For the University of Sherbrooke, it was a matter of course to give him an honorary doctorate.

As an 86-year-old, Mr. Suzuki has not lost any of its passion for promoting the environment and boosting the debate on climate change. This was what members of the university community could observe on 16 June during a theme day held at the Health Campus to highlight UdeS ‘obligations in relation to CO2 neutrality and in the fight against climate change.

From left: Professor Dominique Dorion, Dean of FMSS, Professor David Suzuki and Professor Pierre Cossette, Rector of UdeS.  Photo: Mathieu Lanthier - UdeS
From left: Professor Dominique Dorion, Dean of FMSS, Professor David Suzuki and Professor Pierre Cossette, Rector of UdeS.
Photo: Mathieu Lanthier – UdeS

When the well-known geneticist and zoologist walked through our campus to hold a conference, he warmly agreed to join the large UdeS family by receiving a doctorate honoris causa institutional.

For the person who submitted Mr. Suzuki’s candidacy for leadership of UdeS, Professor Dominique Dorion, was privileged to receive this distinguished guest greatly:

As people who work in health and research, we know that Mr. Suzuki’s great fight against global warming is closely linked to the health of the population. We believe that it is our social responsibility to actively combat these climate changes and find possible solutions to address the consequences.

Dominique Dorion, Dean of the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences

In the eyes of the Rector, the famous scientist, activist and popularizer embodies the hope that underlies our commitment to action in the field of sustainable development:

According to the rector, Professor Suzuki embodies the values ​​that characterize UdeS.  Photo: Mathieu Lanthier - UdeS
According to the rector, Professor Suzuki embodies the values ​​that characterize UdeS.
Photo: Mathieu Lanthier – UdeS

Mr. Suzuki has largely defended nature and our environment throughout its life, a cause that is also very dear to the Université de Sherbrooke. One cannot dedicate one’s life to the teaching, education and popularization of science without being convinced that humans are capable of great achievements, without believing that we will be able to meet the enormous challenges that lie ahead. U.S!

Pierre Cossette, Rector of the University of Sherbrooke

In his words of thanks, Mr. Suzuki that he was happy to receive this honor from a university that has such impressive success in working for the welfare of future generations.

An unprecedented moment for humanity

Using his candor, David Suzuki reminded us that climate change is everyone's business.  Photo: Mathieu Lanthier - UdeS
David Suzuki spoke candidly and reminded us that climate change is everyone’s business.
Photo: Mathieu Lanthier – UdeS

Mr. Suzuki continued with a hard-hitting, informative and at times touching conference on climate change.

The publicity that hung on the lips of the eminent biologist was first transported to the origins of mankind, where man, who regarded himself as other living beings, occupied a just and just place in the ecosystem.

“But throughout our history, the great potential of our brain has led us to make mistakes, including believing that we could transform the ecosystem into a pyramid that we rule on top of. We have become an invasive species for the planet. Our world lives through in the moment an unprecedented moment. “

According to Mr.  Suzuki inspires indigenous peoples to respect nature and should serve as role models in the fight against climate change.  Photo: Mathieu Lanthier - UdeS
According to Mr. Suzuki inspires indigenous peoples to respect nature and should serve as role models in the fight against climate change.
Photo: Mathieu Lanthier – UdeS

To argue for greater respect for natural laws and environmental boundaries, Mr. Suzuki the exemplary connection that the first nations have with their environment.

A child who is taught to regard the mountain as a divinity will seek to protect it for the rest of his life. A child who is praised for the value of the gold it contains will seek to deplete its resources. We need to change the way we see and handle the world, and have a longer term that spans 7 generations.

David Suzuki

Choosing a meat-free diet, reviewing our forms of travel by limiting the use of airplanes in particular, and buying clothes more responsibly are some of the individual actions that Mr. Suzuki encourages reversal.

Despite his 86-year-old age, the eminent scientist and popularizer has not lost any of his enthusiasm for raising public awareness of how urgent it is to act to secure a future for future generations.  Photo: Mathieu Lanthier - UdeS
Despite his 86-year-old age, the eminent scientist and popularizer has not lost any of his enthusiasm for raising public awareness of how urgent it is to act to secure a future for future generations.
Photo: Mathieu Lanthier – UdeS

The speaker also mentioned civic engagement as the main lever: “Fish and birds do not vote. Governments have no interest in making decisions that affect them. Each and every one of us must act now by engaging politically, out of love for our children. . »

“No human being can create air or water. It is a gift of nature. We have a responsibility.”

Those who rely on scientific facts believe that action and mobilization will enable us to secure a future for future generations. “We are all in the same canoe. We must learn to row together. »

The conference, which was served in English, was broadcast on YouTube in a format with French subtitles. The quotes in this text are a free translation by the editors.

A career devoted to the protection of nature
David Suzuki’s impressive track record begins in 1958, the year he graduated with a bachelor’s degree in biology from Amherst College, Massachusetts. Four years later, with a doctorate in zoology in hand, he decided to devote himself to teaching, first in genetics, then in zoology.

From associate professor in 1993 to professor emeritus in 2001, he has advanced knowledge of, among other things, genetic mutations caused by climate change. His work has earned him many accolades, including the highly prestigious Right Livelihood Award, commonly known as the “Alternative Nobel Prize”. His contribution to society is such that he has received no less than 29 honors from Canadian, American and Australian universities.

A unique popularizer, Mr. Suzuki spearheaded the show The nature of things broadcast since 1979 by the CBC channel and still airing in about 50 countries. He has also published more than 50 books on climate change, including 19 books for children.

On the small screen as well as through his writings and public speeches, David Suzuki has always tried to stimulate our interest in the environment by presenting us with different perspectives. Through his fight against the climate crisis, he also demonstrates his support for First Nations by defending the very strong ties they have maintained with nature.

One of his greatest achievements is the creation of the David Suzuki Foundation together with his wife Tara Cullis, a globally recognized organization.

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